sigh

sigh vb Sigh, sob, moan, groan are comparable as verbs when they mean to emit a sound, commonly an inarticulate sound, indicative of mental or physical pain or distress and as nouns, such a sound.
Sigh implies a deep audible respiration that is a usually involuntary expression of grief, intense longing, regret, discouragement, weariness, or boredom
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sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more, men were deceivers ever—Shak.

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a sigh uttered from the fullness of the heart— Hazlitt

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the stranger sometimes seemed to be under stress, sighed much and muttered inaudibly to himself— Malamud

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Sob implies a sound made by a convulsive catching of the breath when weeping or when both speaking and crying or when trying to restrain tears; the noun, however, more often refers solely to this sound than does the verb, which often implies accompanying tears and speech
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"Ah!" It was a long, grieving sound, like a sigh—almost like a sobDickens

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the mother . . . knelt by his side, and they prayed, and their joint sobs shook their bodies, but neither of them shed many tears— Meredith

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she sobbed out her story

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like a child sobbing itself to sleep

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Moan implies a low, prolonged, usually inarticulate sound, especially one that is indicative of intense suffering of mind or body
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they are quick to hear the moans of immemorial grief— Blunden

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Polly moaned, overwhelmed with retrospective shame and embarrassment— Huxley

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to hear the piteous moan that Rutland made— Shak.

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The term, however, is often extended to sounds sugges-tive of pain, complaint, or murmuring
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the moan of the wind

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the moan of doves in immemorial elms— Tennyson

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the rain and the wind splashed and gurgled and moaned round the house— Kipling

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Groan implies a heavier sound than moan and more often suggests an unbearable weight of suffering or a strong spirit of rebelliousness to pain or discomfort
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thy groans did make wolves howl— Shak.

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the whole creation groaneth and travaileth in pain together until now— Rom 8:22

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Often however, in extended use the term carries no hint of suffering but implies noises made in strong disapproval or in pretended suffering
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greet a speaker with groans

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or by something that moves or swings heavily
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trees groaning in the wind

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the door upon its hinges groansKeats

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the groan under the floorboard had changed to a screech— Wouk

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Analogous words: lament, *deplore, bemoan, bewail: *long, yearn, pine, hunger, thirst
sigh n groan, moan, sob (see under SIGH vb)
Analogous words: regret, *sorrow, grief

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Sigh — Концерт Sigh, сентябрь 2008 Основная инфо …   Википедия

  • sigh´er — sigh «sy», verb, noun. –v.i. 1. to let out a very long, deep breath because one is sad, tired, or relieved: »We heard her sigh with relief. 2. to make a sound like a sigh: »The wind sighed in the treetops. Nought but a lovely sighing of the wind… …   Useful english dictionary

  • Sigh — est un groupe de black metal japonais de Tokyo formé en 1989. Leur premier album Scorn Defeat (1994) a été enregistré sur le label d Euronymous (Mayhem) Deathlike silence Records et sort peu après sa mort. suite au décès d Euronymous, Sigh change …   Wikipédia en Français

  • sigh — [sī] vi. [ME sighen, back form. < sihten, pt. of siken < OE sican, to sigh: prob. echoic] 1. to take in and let out a long, deep, audible breath, esp. in expressing sorrow, relief, fatigue, longing, etc. 2. to make a sound like that of a… …   English World dictionary

  • Sigh — Sigh, n. [OE. sigh; cf. OE. sik. See {Sigh}, v. i.] 1. A deep and prolonged audible inspiration or respiration of air, as when fatigued or grieved; the act of sighing. [1913 Webster] I could drive the boat with my sighs. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sigh — sigh·er; sigh·ful; sigh·ing·ly; sigh; …   English syllables

  • Sigh — Sigh, v. i. [imp. & p. p. {Sighed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Sighing}.] [OE. sighen, si?en; cf. also OE. siken, AS. s[=i]can, and OE. sighten, si?ten, sichten, AS. siccettan; all, perhaps, of imitative origin.] 1. To inhale a larger quantity of air than… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Sigh — Sigh, v. t. 1. To exhale (the breath) in sighs. [1913 Webster] Never man sighed truer breath. Shak. [1913 Webster] 2. To utter sighs over; to lament or mourn over. [1913 Webster] Ages to come, and men unborn, Shall bless her name, and sigh her… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • sigh — inter. ES ingl. {{wmetafile0}} spec. nel linguaggio dei fumetti, indica il pianto, il singhiozzo o un sospiro; anche s.m.inv. {{line}} {{/line}} DATA: sec. XX. ETIMO: ingl. sigh propr. sospiro , der. di (to) sigh sospirare , di orig. onom …   Dizionario italiano

  • sigh — c.1300 (n. and v.), probably a back formation from sighte, past tense of O.E. sican to sigh, perhaps echoic of the sound of sighing …   Etymology dictionary

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